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GovHack 2017

Submitted on Friday, 28th July - 5.44.

This weekend about a thousand people all over the country will spend their weekend at GovHack. They will come together to push the boundaries of the intersection between government, technology, and the civic imagination. They do this so that we can imagine alternative ways to tackle social, political and economic problems.

Civic ‘hack’ events are predicated on the assumption that those who are impacted by government decisions have the right to participate in the activity of governments and influence these decisions. To encourage this we strive to share resources in increasingly meaningful ways and to foster a culture where all participants dictate the terms around which they contribute.

Hack events are places of learning. People who participate do so for a number of reasons, many of these have something to do with personal and professional development and they then carry these skills into their day jobs and into areas beyond the ‘event’ itself.

If we think about what an event like GovHack means we should acknowledge the commitment and dedication of those who host, participate, volunteer and sponsor. For all of us it’s the long term impacts that will make the most difference.

By considering to extent to which we’re trying to make technology civic or make civics technological or both at the same time, we might be able to challenge the conventions of hack events themselves and assign priority to activity over outcome, function over prototype and demonstrable outcomes over novelty factor.

So Gov Hacker’s, we offer you the following provocations:

  • Do we start with data or stories?
  • What happens when we bring together our social conscience and design sensibilities?
  • Who is the end and ultimate user of the things we pitch?
  • What is the true utility of the thing we pitch?
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Powerline Bushfire Safety Program - Vegetation Detection Challenge

Submitted on Thursday, 30th November - 0.07.

In 2017 the Victorian Government’s Powerline Bushfire Safety Program (PBSP) called on the data science and technology community for bright ideas to detect vegetation faults on powerlines to improve powerline safety and avoid potential fire risks.

The Vegetation Detection Challenge (the Challenge) made available comprehensive research data of electrical characteristics of powerline faults for three particular plant species. Four shortlisted teams extrapolated the data to develop a vegetation detection algorithm.

The full set of data, including tests for 12 vegetation species is still available for use on Data.Vic.

The Powerline Bushfire Safety Program, Research & Development team aims for this initiative to stimulate the development of existing data to be potentially turned into effective technologies for real-life application of the future.  

The best proposal in the Challenge received government support to access industry and research collaborators to aid in progressing their innovative concept to potentially develop improved detection equipment.

Watch the video to hear from the competing teams and find out who was awarded the Challenge winner.

Read the proposal summary sheets developed by the teams below. For access to the team's algorithms, please refer to the PBSP Vegetation Detection Challenge page.

If you would like to discuss the vegetation conduction ignition data with the PBSP, please email fault.signature@delwp.vic.gov.au.

Disclaimer - This material is provided as information only. The Victorian Government and this agency (Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning):

a)   makes no warranty, either express or implied, in respect of the material, including (but not limited to) in relation to the accuracy, reliability, availability, or the currency of the material at any time, or as to its suitability for any purpose; and

b)   does not accept any liability to any person for the material, or for the information or advice provided on this website or incorporated into it by reference (or for the use of such material, information or advice). No responsibility is taken for any information or services that may appear on any linked websites.

Please note that the relevant team are the owners of intellectual property in the algorithm, which has been licensed to the State in accordance with the terms and conditions of participation in the Vegetation Detection Challenge.

If you wish to reproduce, publish, communicate to the public, adapt, modify or otherwise use the algorithm, you must first contact the relevant team.

 

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GovHack 2017 Challenge - Free from Violence

Submitted on Friday, 28th July - 10.06.

Challenge

Challenge owner - Department of Premier and Cabinet

Of women over the age of 15: 

  • 1 in 3 has experienced physical violence 
  • 1 in 4 has experienced physical or sexual violence 
  • 1 in 5 has experienced sexual violence. 

In May 2017 the Victorian government released Free from violence.  Victoria's strategy to prevent family violence and all forms of violence against women 

How do we ensure that every Victorian is aware of the drivers of violence and what needs to be done to address them, as well as their individual responsibility to prevent it. 

 

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GovHack 2017 Challenge - Rethinking Data: From and content

Submitted on Friday, 28th July - 10.04.

Challenge

Challenge owner - Department of Premier and Cabinet

Governments seek evidence based solutions. Government data does not live in isolation. How can we combine office government data with other sources to create new insights? Telling stories with data isn't just about cleaning up and making sense of numbers so are there ways to bring datasets together in creative ways. Can we present data in formats like sound, film, games etc.? 

Data sources  - we want you to look far and wide for your data and think way outside the box on this one. 
National Film and TV Archive; Hansard ; data.vic, data.nsw, data.gov etc 

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GovHack Challenge 2017 - Traffic condition information for consumption and dissemination

Submitted on Friday, 28th July - 9.01.

Challenge

Challenge owner - VicRoads

The lack of availability of traffic condition information for consumption and dissemination by data aggregators and information brokers to ensure road network users can access journey planning and decision making information is impacting the ability of Melbournians to retain and enhance their quality of life.

This also impacts Melbourne's reputation as a productive and attractive global city as network reliability and productivity are also impacted. The key theme which underpins supporting integrated transport choices was the need for a single authoritative source for full travel information that the key stakeholders can access. While there are many third party sources (e.g. Google / Apple Maps, here.com) which supply certain elements of related information, there is still an unfulfilled service demand for a more holistic solution.

Can a pre-trip journey planner be designed to provide the public with options for determining the optimal means of travelling between two or more given locations, using one or more transport mode/s including public transport car, pedestrian and bicycle routing and taking into account user preferences and constraints? Could it taken into account user preferences and constraints may include desired transport mode/s, time and/or date of travel, for cars the user may choose tolls , for bicycles the user may choose either shortest path or avoiding traffic?

VicRoads Data

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GovHack 2017 Challenge - A chat-bot for navigating VicGov spatial data

Submitted on Friday, 28th July - 8.59.

Challenge

Challenge Owner - Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning

Making data accessible is about much more than shoving it on a website; data needs to be understandable and user-friendly. Government should meet users where they are at, not demand you scale great mountains of jargon to reach our Rapunzel data. We live in an era of mass-personalisation and our data services should follow suit. Let’s have a conversation about our awesome data, to help you find and use it better. Let’s try and codify some of our expertise and serve this out to data users along with the data itself.


The Aim of this Challenge is to create a chatbot application that helps users find and understand open spatial data products, utilising the published metadata, product descriptions, FAQ’s, etc about the products but presenting it in a more conversational and user-directed way. It will help users – who might be researchers, students, other government personnel and policy people, application developers, and citizen-scientists - find and understand if data is fit-for-purpose for their needs.


DELWP stores and publishes many open spatial datasets available from the Victorian government; DELWP is the Custodian for the Vicmap suite of foundation spatial data products, maintains the metadata stores, enables data to be consumed by open data portals such as www.data.vic.gov.au and data.gov.au, and delivers downloadable content via Spatial DataMart. This data is authoritative, accurate, and freely available to the public.  The data can be used for many purposes but understanding where to start, and the metadata and product descriptions that come with this data can be daunting; terminology can be domain-specific, and many pages of content may need to be read to understand whether a dataset is appropriate for a particular use. Discovery portals help narrow content down, but a user still needs to process many pages of technical metadata descriptions to get answers to specific questions they may have about the data – and reference to a dictionary may also be required! From a certain perspective, this is appropriate; DELWP follows rigorous international standards in the formal description of our data. However, it can lead to descriptions like this:

  • Vicmap Admin comprises several individual datasets. Each is topologically structured and models all designated and gazetted boundaries across the whole of Victoria.
  • The Vicmap Admin spatial data set consists of a series of polygons depicting administrative boundaries, which in turn, define a state-wide coverage of contiguous non-overlapping polygons. In combination these polygons represent the entire administration area of Victoria.

While that is specific and correct, a non-GIS professional might have a hard time understanding whether this is the dataset to use to find council boundaries.

 

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GovHack 2017 Challenge - Participation in Sport and Access to Sporting infrastructure

Submitted on Friday, 28th July - 8.56.

Challenge

Challenge owner - Latrobe Valley Authority

Governments all over the world have recognized that there is a relationship between sport and social inclusion. Whether it's as a spectator or participant sport can be a significant driver of vibrancy and togetherness in a community. But many are marginalized and excluded from sport for a variety of reasons.

This challenge seeks to address the issue of inclusion in sport throughout the Latrobe valley community through raising awareness, connecting people and fostering active lifestyles.
 

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GovHack 2017 Challenge - Social inclusion, economic participation and regional youth

Submitted on Friday, 28th July - 8.54.

Challenge

Challenge owner - Latrobe Valley Authority

A new $4.3 million youth space in Morwell will be designed for and with Latrobe Valley's young people. The innovative and contemporary facility will deliver a range of programs, activities and services connecting our young people to education, training, employment and broader community life. It will also be a base for social enterprises to provide training and placement, including work experience and pathways to employment.

This challenge seeks the design of informational resources, mobile, and web applications that help support the activities of youth space and youth in the region more broadly.

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GovHack 2017 Challenge - What's my best way home?

Submitted on Friday, 28th July - 8.51.

Challenge

Challenge Owner - Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning

How can we use Victoria's open Government data to help the community find the quickest and safest way home? Is there a way to encourage crowd-sourcing of data anomalies?

Melbourne has consistently been ranked as one of the world's most livable cities in the world. Our cohesive and stable society, healthcare, education, and world class infrastructure make Melbourne a magnificent city in which to live and work. Increasing population in Melbourne has resulted with congested road/foot traffic which impact the community during peak times, such as exiting an event/concert/footy, or the event of train line faults. Knowing your surround provides location advantage, but others can benefit from knowledge sharing. Social media is becoming an essential component to crowdsourcing as it allows organizations to reach a wider audience faster, cheaper and more efficiently than ever before. Using location based apps to review, comment and provide feedback have gained popularity with the likes of Waize, Uber, Zomato, Yelp etc.

DELWP stores and publishes many open spatial datasets available from the Victorian government; DELWP is the Custodian for the Vicmap suite of foundation spatial data products, maintains the metadata stores, enables data to be consumed by open data portals such as www.data.vic.gov.au and data.gov.au, and delivers downloadable content via Spatial DataMart. This data is authoritative, accurate, and freely available to the public. Exposing information and services to the community and government agencies is one of our primary drivers. There is opportunity to empower the community to promote DELWP’s foundational data with the creation of a knowledge sharing/crowd-sourcing idea. 

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GovHack 2017 Challenge - Exploring the Links Between Environment and Health

Submitted on Friday, 28th July - 8.46.

Challenge

Challenge Owner - Environment Protection Authority

Human health and quality of life are greatly impacted by the state of the environment. How can we combine data from multiple sources to better understand the relationship between health and environment? Can we develop predictive tools to identify health issues that are strongly influence by the environment? Data sources could come from EPA, other agencies such as BoM and self-reported data from the community regarding symptoms they experience.

EPA Data

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